GAA, high-casein diet and hyperhomocysteinemia

GAA, high-casein diet and hyperhomocysteinemia

To determine the effect of dietary protein level on experimental hyperhomocysteinemia, rats were fed 10% casein (10C) and 40% casein (40C) diets with or without 0.5% guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) for 14 d. In addition, rats were fed 10C + 0.75% methionine (10CM) and 40C + 0.75% methionine (40CM) diets with or without 2.5% serine for 14 d to determine the relationship between the dietary protein level and intensity of the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine. GAA supplementation markedly increased the plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed with the 10C diet, whereas it did not increase the plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed with the 40C diet. Although serine supplementation significantly suppressed the methionine-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration, the decreased plasma homocysteine concentration was significantly lower in rats fed with the 40CM diet than in rats fed with the 10CM diet. The hepatic cystathionine beta-synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase activities were significantly higher in rats fed with the 40C or 40CM diet than in rats fed with the 10C or 10CM diet, irrespective of supplementation with GAA and serine. These results indicate that the high-casein diet was effective for both suppressing GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia and potentiating the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine, probably through the enhanced activity of homocysteine-metabolizing enzymes.

Ohuchi S, Matsumoto Y, Morita T, Sugiyama K. High-casein diet suppresses guanidinoacetic acid-induced hyperhomocysteinemia and potentiates the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine in rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2008 Dec;72(12):3258-64.

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