GAA can be used to replace arginine in deficient diets

GAA can be used to replace arginine in deficient diets

Two studies were conducted to test the efficacy of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) to spare Arg and serve as a precursor of creatine (Cr) by evaluating growth performance and muscle cellular energy homeostasis in broiler chicks. In both studies, 12 replicate pens of 6 chicks received dietary treatments beginning at day 2 post-hatch. At conclusion of each study, muscle biopsy samples were collected within 60 s of euthanasia for analysis of Cr-related energy metabolites. In study 1, Arg-deficient starter and grower basal diets were supplemented with 0 (negative control, NC), 0.06, 0.12, or 0.18% GAA, or supplemental Arg (positive control, PC; 0.37 and 0.32% L-Arg in starter and grower phases, respectively). Dietary GAA elicited graded improvements, with final BW, overall BW gain, and overall G:F being increased (P < 0.05) by 0.12% GAA compared with the NC diet with no difference to PC diet. Increases (P < 0.001) of phosphocreatine (PCr), total Cr (tCr), and glycogen concentrations, as well as the PCr-to-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glycogen:ATP ratios, were observed with supplementation of 0.12% GAA compared with the NC diet, even exceeding responses to the PC diet. In study 2, Arg-adequate starter and grower basal diets were supplemented with 0 (negative control, NC), 0.06, or 0.12% GAA, 0.12% Cr monohydrate (PC1), or salmon protein (PC2; containing total Arg concentrations equal to those of the NC diet in each phase and containing similar Cr as in PC1). Overall G:F was increased (P < 0.05) by PC1, but not by PC2, compared with the NC, while GAA supplementation elicited a response intermediate to NC and PC1 diets. However, GAA supplementation increased (P < 0.01) concentrations of tCr and glycogen, as well as the PCr:ATP and glycogen:ATP ratios, when compared with the NC (Arg-adequate) diet. Collectively, these data indicate that GAA can be used to replace Arg in practical, Arg-deficient diets and improve muscle energy homeostasis in broiler chicks receiving either Arg-deficient or Arg-adequate practical diets.

DeGroot AA, Braun U, Dilger RN. Guanidinoacetic acid is efficacious in improving growth performance and muscle energy homeostasis in broiler chicks fed arginine-deficient or arginine-adequate diets. Poult Sci. 2019;98(7):2896-2905. doi:10.3382/ps/pez036

Categories: Feed Additive

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.