Archives

GAA and creatine in aquafeeds

Creatine is an amino acid derivate commonly found in vertebrate muscle tissue. Creatine facilitates the recycling of adenosine triphosphate and thus contributes to the energy supply of the muscles as well as the brain. Creatine is used as a supplement for several reasons and its effects in humans, particularly in sports medicine, have been studied […]

Read More

Safety of dietary guanidinoacetic acid

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural amino acid derivative that is well-recognized for its central role in the biosynthesis of creatine, an essential compound involved in cellular energy metabolism. GAA (also known as glycocyamine or betacyamine) has been investigated as an energy-boosting dietary supplement in humans for more than 70 years. GAA is suggested to […]

Read More

Regulation with GAA on muscle development

Guanidinoacetic acid is the direct precursor of creatine and its phosphorylated derivative phosphocreatine in the body. It is a safe nutritional supplement that can be used to promote muscle growth and development. Improving the growth performance of livestock and poultry and meat quality is the eternal goal of the animal husbandry, and it is also […]

Read More

Physiological roles of GAA and its relationship with arginine

The role of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and its relationship with arginine was reviewed in order to define a replacement ratio between GAA and arginine for broiler diet formulation, the ratio being of how much arginine could be spared, or replaced by GAA. Guanidionoacetic acid, the precursor of creatine, can be synthesized de novo from the […]

Read More

GAA deficiency: a new entity in clinical medicine

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA, also known as glycocyamine or betacyamine) is a naturally-occurring derivative of glycine and a direct metabolic precursor of creatine, a key player in high-phosphate cellular bioenergetics. GAA is found in human serum and urine, with circulating GAA likely reflects an equilibrium between its endogenous production and utilization/excretion. GAA deficiency (as indicated by […]

Read More

Human gut microbiota as a source of GAA

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural amino acid derivative that acts as a precursor of creatine while being synthesized and utilized in a two-step reaction that takes place in the human kidney and liver. In this paper, we have proposed that guanidinoacetase, an enzyme present in healthy gut microbiota, might contribute to gross GAA turnover […]

Read More

GAA could minimize broiler muscle myopathies

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the biochemical precursor of creatine, which, in its phosphorylated form, is an essential high-energy carrier in the muscle. Although creatine has limited stability in feed processing, GAA is well established as a source of creatine in the animal feed industry. Published data demonstrate beneficial effects of GAA supplementation on muscle creatine, […]

Read More

Guanidinoacetic acid as a feed supplement for poultry

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is immediate substrate for biosynthesis of creatine (CREA). The phosphorylated form of CREA serves as a rapidly mobilisable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle to recycle adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and replenish cellular energy levels. Aside from improving energy utilisation, GAA possesses several features which further enhance its value as a feed […]

Read More

Benefits and drawbacks of GAA in AGAT deficiency

Arginine-glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that severely affects brain bioenergetics. Characterized by mental retardation, language impairment, and behavioral disorders, AGAT deficiency is a treatable condition, where long-term creatine supplementation usually restores brain creatine levels and improves its clinical features. In some cases of AGAT deficiency, creatine treatment might be somewhat […]

Read More

Creatine and GAA for tissue bioenergetics

A confined absorption of exogenous creatine through creatine transporter (CRT1) seems to hamper its optimal uptake in bioenergetical deficits. Co-administration of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) along with creatine could target other transport channels besides CRT1, and supremely improve cellular levels of creatine. This innovative approach might tackle tissues difficult to reach with conventional creatine interventions, providing […]

Read More