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Dose-response effects of dietary GAA

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of creatine (Cr), yet its use in human nutrition is limited due to a lack of a clear understanding of its’ dose-response effect. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three different dosages of GAA (1.2, 2.4 and 4.8 g/day) administered […]

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Creatine and GAA in human milk and infant formulas

Creatine is essential for normal neural development; children with inborn errors of creatine synthesis or transport exhibit neurological symptoms such as mental retardation, speech delay and epilepsy. Creatine accretion may occur through dietary intake or de novo creatine synthesis. The objective of the present study was to determine how much creatine an infant must synthesise […]

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Methyl donors and GAA balance serum homocysteine

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the natural biosynthetic precursor of creatine, in a metabolic reaction that requires only a methyl group transfer. The use of GAA as a food additive for restoring creatine load in human tissues is rather unexplored and data on efficacy and safety are limited. In particular, an increase in serum homocysteine after […]

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Safety profiles after six-week GAA intake

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural precursor of creatine, yet the potential use of GAA as a nutritional additive for restoring creatine availability in humans has been limited by unclear efficacy and safety after exogenous GAA administration. The present study evaluated the effects of orally administered GAA on serum and urinary GAA, creatine and creatinine […]

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