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Guanidinoacetic acid can spare arginine in chicks

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is formed from arginine (Arg) and is the immediate precursor to creatine (Cr) and phosphocreatine (PCr), which are important compounds involved in muscle energy homeostasis. This study sought to determine whether GAA could spare Arg in broiler chicks fed an Arg-deficient practical diet. A basal [0.84% standardized ileal digestible (SID) Arg] was […]

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Arginine and GAA feeding under high-altitude hypoxia

This study assessed the preventive effects of arginine (ARG) and guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on the incidence of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS) in broiler chickens. Four isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets were prepared, including: (i) the control, (ii) the control supplemented with 1 g/kg ARG, (iii) the control supplemented with 1 g/kg GAA, and (iv) the control […]

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Feeding GAA improved lean meat yield in pigs

Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality in pigs from wean to finish (Exp 1) and finishing pigs fed GAA at different time periods before slaughter (Exp 2). In Exp 1, a total of 360 weaned pigs (Duroc × […]

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Temperature, arginine or GAA intake in broilers

The aim of this experiment was to study the interactive effect of rearing temperature and dietary supplementation of arginine (Arg) or guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on performance, gut morphology and ascites indices in broiler chickens raised under the same condition in the first 2 weeks and then reared under normal (23-26°C) or subnormal (17°C) ambient temperatures […]

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GAA supplementation for semen quality and fertility

Decreased semen quality and fertility rate is a common feature in broiler breeder roosters. This decrease is associated with dysfunction of Sertoli cells and defective spermatogenesis. Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), as a precursor of creatine, plays an important role in the proper functioning of Sertoli cells and energy metabolism in sperm. Twenty, 29-wk-old broiler breeder roosters […]

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Digestibility and metabolism of dietary GAA

In two feeding experiments the retention of supplemental guanidine acetic acid (GAA) in broilers was investigated. In both experiments, the same three treatments were used; the basal feed was supplemented with 0, 0.6, or 6.0 g GAA per kg of feed. While in a growth study (experiment 1) day-old, male Ross 308 broilers were fed […]

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GAA for fertility rate and sperm penetration

Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and L-arginine (ARG) on fertility and sperm penetration (SP) rate of broiler breeder hens. In the first experiment, a total of 200 broiler breeder hens (Ross 308) aged 53 weeks were randomly allotted to four dietary treatments (0, 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 […]

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GAA in meat-type quail breeders and reproduction

This study was conducted to assess the effect of dietary supplementation of meat-type quail breeders with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on their reproductive parameters and progeny performance. Two hundred forty meat-type quails at 25 wk of age were distributed in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 8 replicates of 6 birds each. The treatments […]

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GAA in all-vegetable diets improved performance

Creatine, (CREA) a central constituent in energy metabolism, is obtained from dietary animal protein or de novo synthesis from guanidinoacetic acid (GAA). Especially in all-vegetable diets, supplemental CREA or GAA may restore the CREA availability in tissues, and hence, improve performance. In this study, 768 one-d-old male Ross 308 broilers were assigned to 1 of […]

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Dietary creatine and GAA for methylation demand

S-adenosylmethionine, formed by the adenylation of methionine via S-adenosylmethionine synthase, is the methyl donor in virtually all known biological methylations. These methylation reactions produce a methylated substrate and S-adenosylhomocysteine, which is subsequently metabolized to homocysteine. The methylation of guanidinoacetate to form creatine consumes more methyl groups than all other methylation reactions combined. Therefore, we examined […]

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