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GAA improves creatine deposition in broilers

The objective of this study was to assess the effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on growth performance, creatine deposition and blood amino acid (AA) profile on broiler chickens. In Exp. 1, a total of 540 one-day-old Arbor Acres male broilers (average initial body weight, 45.23 ± 0.35 g) were divided randomly into five treatments with […]

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GAA modulates testicular histology in roosters

Decline in semen quality is considered as a major contributing factor in age-related subfertility of broiler breeder flocks. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), as an alternative energy source along with antioxidant potential, on testicular histology and relative gene expression of some spermatogonial markers (c-Kit and […]

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Combined effects of GAA, coenzyme Q 10 and taurine

High levels of guanidinoacetate acid (GAA) deteriorate growth response in broiler chickens. We propose using coenzyme Q10 , an antioxidant, and taurine (TAU), a methyl donor, to cope with the situation when high level of GAA included in diet. GAA was supplemented at 0 (control), 0.75, 1.5 and 2.25 g/kg in isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets […]

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GAA and creatine improve growth and meat quality

This study aimed to investigate the effects of creatine monohydrate (CMH) and guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation on the growth performance, meat quality, and creatine metabolism of finishing pigs. The pigs were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: the control group, CMH group, and GAA group. In comparison to the control group, CMH treatment increased average […]

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Growth and ventricular hypertrophy after GAA feeding

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) has been shown to spare arginine (ARG) requirements in chickens. ARG plays a critical role in enhancing growth and preventing right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) in broiler chickens subjected to hypobaric hypoxia. However, ARG is not available as a feed grade supplement in the market. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of commercially available […]

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GAA effective independent of diet nutrient density

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the single immediate endogenous precursor of creatine (Cr). It was hypothesised that dietary GAA would have different effects on performance and energy metabolites in breast muscle depending on the nutrient density (ND) of corn-soybean-based diets. A total of 540 one-day-old male Ross 308 broilers were allocated to 9 dietary treatments with […]

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Dietary GAA could increase the creatine and ATP load

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on the growth performance, creatine and energy metabolism, and carcass characteristics in growing-finishing pigs. In Exp. 1, Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire pigs (n = 180, 33.61 ± 3.91 kg average BW) were blocked by weight and sex, […]

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Energy utilisation in response to GAA feeding

This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on productive performance, intestinal morphometric features, blood parameters and energy utilisation in broiler chickens. A total of 390 male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were assigned to six dietary treatments based on a factorial arrangement (2×3) across 1-15 and 15-35-d periods. Experimental treatments consisted […]

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GAA improved broiler live performance

One experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation in broilers fed corn or sorghum-based diets on live performance, carcass and cut up yields, meat quality, and pectoral myopathies. The treatments consisted of corn or sorghum-based diets with or without the addition of GAA (600 g/ton). A total of 800 one-d-old […]

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GAA feeding for live performance and meat quality

Creatine is a nitrogenous compound naturally occurring in animal tissues and is obtained from dietary animal protein or de novo synthesis from guanidinoacetic acid (GAA). The dietary supply of this semi-essential nutrient could be adversely compromised when feeding purely vegetable-based diets. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of GAA supplementation in […]

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