GAA Research Library

Physiological roles of GAA and its relationship with arginine

The role of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and its relationship with arginine was reviewed in order to define a replacement ratio between GAA and arginine for broiler diet formulation, the ratio being of how much arginine could be spared, or replaced by GAA. Guanidionoacetic acid, the precursor of creatine, can be synthesized de novo from the […]

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GAA supplementation and nitrogen retention

Creatine stores high-energy phosphate bonds in muscle and is synthesized in the liver through methylation of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA). Supplementation of GAA may therefore increase methyl group requirements, and this may affect methyl group utilization. Our experiment evaluated the metabolic responses of growing cattle to postruminal supplementation of GAA, in a model where methionine (Met) […]

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Urinary GAA significantly altered in ASD

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders. So far, there is no valid biomarker for the early diagnosis of ASD and a large-scale and multi-center study aims to identify metabolic variations between ASD and healthy children and to investigate differential metabolites and associated pathogenic mechanisms. MeOne hundred and seventeen autistic children […]

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GAA and betaine for growth performance

This study evaluated the influences of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and betaine (BT) on growth performance, nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation in bulls. Forty-four Angus bulls were blocked by live body weight and then randomly divided into four groups in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Betaine of 0 or 0.6 g/kg dry matter (DM) was […]

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Muscle GAA after creatine supplementation

Diets with six levels of creatine were hand-fed to juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei reared in freshwater for 46 days. Results showed creatine supplementation did not affect the growth performance (FBW: 17.04 ± 1.28 g) or the content of guanidinoacetic acid in muscle and hepatopancreas whereas significantly increased muscular creatine content. Diet with 8.28 g kg-1 creatine […]

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GAA drops in hemodialysis patients

Muscle wasting, low protein intake, hypoalbuminemia, low body mass, and chronic fatigue are prevalent in hemodialysis patients. Impaired creatine status may be an often overlooked, potential contributor to these symptoms. However, little is known about creatine homeostasis in hemodialysis patients. We aimed to elucidate creatine homeostasis in hemodialysis patients by assessing intradialytic plasma changes as […]

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Urinary GAA for CCDD screening

Cerebral creatine deficiency disorders (CCDD) are inherited metabolic disorders of creatine synthesis and transport. Urine creatine metabolite panel is helpful to identify these disorders. We reviewed electronic patient charts for all patients that underwent urine creatine metabolite panel testing in the metabolic laboratory at our institution. There were 498 tests conducted on 413 patients. Clinical, […]

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Supplemental GAA or creatine spare arginine

Suckling piglets synthesize most of their creatine requirement, which consumes substantial amounts of arginine in order to synthesize guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and methionine in order to transmethylate GAA to creatine. To determine whether supplemental GAA or creatine spare arginine and/or methionine for protein synthesis and, if GAA is supplemented, whether excess methionine is needed for […]

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GAA as model for small molecule biomarker

The accurate and efficient measurement of small molecule disease markers for clinical diagnosis is of great importance. In this study, a quadrupole-linear ion trap (Q-LIT) tandem mass spectrometer was designed and built in our laboratory. Target precursor ions were first selected in the quadrupole, and then injected, trapped, and fragmented simultaneously in the linear ion […]

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GAA protects against lactic acidemia

Increased blood lactic acid is likely to be involved in sudden death syndrome in broiler chicken. Guanidinoacetic acid with direct or indirect influence on the cardiovascular system may provide, to some degree, protection against lactic acidemia in birds. A total number of 144 male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were used in a complete randomised block […]

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