GAA Research Library

GAA in human nutrition

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a nutrient that has been used in human nutrition since the early 1950s. Recommended for its role in creatine biosynthesis, GAA demonstrated beneficial energy-boosting effects in various clinical conditions. Dietary GAA has also been suggested to trigger several creatine-independent mechanisms. Besides acting as a direct precursor of high-energy phosphagen creatine, dietary […]

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Epileptogenic effects of GAA

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) accumulates in the genetic deficiency of the GAMT enzyme and it is believed to cause the seizures that often occur in this condition. However, evidence that it is indeed epileptogenic is scarce and we previously found that it does not cause neuronal hyperexcitation in in vitro brain slices. Here, we used Micro-Electrode […]

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Reducing myopathies via GAA

Performance and processing advantages have been noted in meat animal production when excess arginine is available in the diet. In addition, dietary inclusion of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) has provided insight on sparing arginine for broiler chickens. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess dietary inclusion of GAA on broiler breast myopathy prevalence. Dietary treatments were […]

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GAA biodynamics in cancer

The renewal and iteration of chemotherapy drugs have resulted in more frequent long-term remissions for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). MM has transformed into a chronic illness for many patients, but the cancer-related fatigue (CRF) of many MM convalescent patients experience is frequently overlooked. We investigated whether the accompanying treatment of family members would affect […]

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Alternatives to creatine

The authors analyzed forms of creatine for sale on Amazon.com and evaluated if the advertised claims are supported by the available scientific evidence, and analyzed the cost per gram of the forms of creatine. A total of 175 creatine supplements were included and the authors reported the total creatine content per serving, form(s) of creatine […]

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GAA affects water holding capacity

The current study was carried out to detect the effect of dietary guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation on carcass characteristics and meat quality in finishing pigs fed different dietary crude protein (CP) levels. Sixty-four barrows with an initial body weight of 73.05 ± 2.34 kg were randomly allocated into 1 of 4 dietary treatments in a […]

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GAA for intestinal function

The current study is designed to investigate dietary guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation on the growth performance, intestinal histomorphology, and jejunum mucosal barrier function of broilers that subjected to chronic heat stress (HS). A total of 192 male broilers (28-d-old) were randomly allocated to four groups. A chronic HS model (at a temperature of 32 °C […]

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GAA supplementation and lactation

Considering the high energy demand of lactation and the potential of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition on the increase in creatine supply for cows, the study investigated the effects of 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 g kg−1 DM of GAA supplementation on lactation performance, nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation in dairy cows. The study used fourty mid-lactation multiparous […]

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Urinary GAA screening

Here, the authors described a rapid quantitative UPLC/MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of these analytes using a normal-phase HILIC column after analyte derivatization. The approach is suitable for neonatal screening follow-ups and monitoring of the treatment for creatine deficiency syndromes. Liu N, Sun Q. Laboratory Diagnosis of Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes by Determining Creatine […]

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GAA, nitrogen retention and methionine flux

Six ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (256 ± 14 kg) were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design to assess effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation on N retention and methionine (Met) methyl group flux in growing cattle fed corn-based diets. Factorial treatments were 2 levels of Met (0 or 5 g/d) and 3 […]

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