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GAA increased egg production and egg mass

Different levels of metabolizable energy (ME) and the inclusion of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) in the diet of 53-week-old Lohmann LSL-CLASSIC hens were used to evaluate its effect on reproductive parameters, egg quality, intestinal morphology, and the immune response. Six diets were used in a 3 × 2 factorial design, with three levels of ME (2850, […]

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Omics of dietary GAA

The development and characteristics of muscle fibers in broilers are critical determinants that influence their growth performance, as well as serve as essential prerequisites for the production of high-quality chicken meat. Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a crucial endogenous substance in animal creatine synthesis, and its utilization as a feed additive has been demonstrated the capabilities […]

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GAA promotes muscle development

The aim of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms through which different levels of GAA affect chicken muscle development by influencing miRNA expression, to lay a theoretical foundation for the identification of key functional small RNAs related to poultry muscle development, and to provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of GAA on […]

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Alteration of GAA in syringomyelia

Syringomyelia (SM) is characterized by the development of fluid-filled cavities, referred to as syrinxes, within the spinal cord tissue. The molecular etiology of SM post-spinal cord injury (SCI) is not well understood and only invasive surgical based treatments are available to treat SM clinically. This study builds upon our previous omics studies and in vitro […]

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Portal GAA appearance requires methionine

Creatine plays a significant role in energy metabolism and positively impacts anaerobic energy capacity, muscle mass, and physical performance. Endogenous creatine synthesis requires guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and methionine. GAA can be an alternative to creatine supplements and has been tested as a beneficial feed additive in the animal industry. When pigs are fed GAA with […]

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Herbal mixture vs. GAA supplementation

Phytogenic feed additives are renowned for their growth promotion, gut health enhancement, and disease prevention properties, which is important factors for sustaining prolonged poultry rearing. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of herbal mixture (mixture of ginseng and artichoke) or guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on growth performance, cecal microbiota, excretal gas emission, blood profile, and […]

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GAA affects liver and breast muscle fat deposition

Exogenous supplementation of guanidinoacetic acid can mechanistically regulate the energy distribution in muscle cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of guanidinoacetic acid supplementation on liver and breast muscle fat deposition, lipid levels, and lipid metabolism-related gene expression in ducks. We randomly divided 480 42 days-old female Jiaji ducks into four groups with six […]

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Whole-cell biocatalysis of GAA

Creatine is a naturally occurring derivative of an amino acid commonly utilized in functional foods and pharmaceuticals. Nevertheless, the current industrial synthesis of creatine relies on chemical processes, which may hinder its utilization in certain applications. Therefore, a biological approach was devised that employs whole-cell biocatalysis in the bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is considered safe […]

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GAA intake in angus steers

This study investigated the effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) supplementation on the growth performance, rumen fermentation, blood indices, nutrient digestion, and nitrogen metabolism of Angus steers. In a 130-day feeding experiment, steers receiving GAA at a conventional dose (0.8 g/kg) and a high dose (1.6 g/kg) exhibited significantly higher average daily weight gain and improved […]

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GAA in low metabolizable energy diet

This study was aimed to explore the elevating energy utilization efficiency mechanism for the potentially ameliorative effect of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition on growth performance of broilers fed a low metabolizable energy (LME) diet. A total of 576 day-old broilers were randomly allocated to one of the 6 treatments: a basal diet (normal ME, positive […]

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